Irrigation Training Series: Stream For Free!

Shopping cart
$0.00

Use Rain To Reduce Your Irrigation Bill

Earn 1 CEU (Continuing Education Unit) For This Training.

Click the CEU logo to submit your request to the IRRIGATION ASSOCIATION.

0
Dave Laybourn

Enterprise Sales Manager – ETwater, a Jain Irrigation Company

Rainfall is free irrigation, but if your controller is not measuring and using the rain properly for irrigation, you are missing out.

Not to mention the embarrassment when your sprinklers are on and it is raining. There are many ways to suspend irrigation during the rain, but the more significant question is when to turn it back on so you do not overwater.

In addition, watering before a rain is costly because your soil is saturated when the rain comes. Finally, rain is measured in inches, and irrigation is applied in inches per hour, and how much of the rain that fell is usable. We are going to answer all these questions on Wednesday. We will discuss:

  1. How to avoid having your sprinklers run during a rain.  
  2. How to suspend irrigation during rainy weather and how to know when to turn irrigation back on?
  3. Using rain forecast to determine when to stop watering to take advantage of the rain. 
  4. How much is water from rain is useful?
Dave Laybourn

ENTERPRISE SALES MANAGER | ETWATER, A JAIN IRRIGATION COMPANY

Before joining Jain Irrigation, Laybourn was at Olson Irrigation where he was responsible for the go-to-market of an automatic self-cleaning water filter for agriculture. Prior to Olson, he worked at Rain Bird in field sales and product management that included being named on two U.S. patents for drip irrigation. “Agriculture is where I learned about ET (evapotranspiration) and how valuable it is, not only for saving water but also for the best plant health,” said Laybourn. “I look forward to sharing this and other insights with the Enterprise about ETwater technology, which should be their basis for making investments in smart irrigation that deliver financial payback and a return on investment that is often much better than the owner’s core business.” Dave Laybourn has a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University.